From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 3, page 55, Exercise #7. In this lesson, we are learning about strings. For the first exercise, we are supposed to combine two (or more) sections of our string together to form a new section that is better suited for the tangle we want to use. Here is what Amanda’s original string looked like, so you can compare it with her finished Zentangle above.

Giving thanks. I have so many things to be thankful for this year, it would make a very long post to list them all. So I am going to tell you that I am grateful for my wonderful husband, beautiful daughters, and fabulous grandchildren. I am thankful for my good health and good life. I also am very thankful that I discovered Eni Oken. She is a fabulous artist that shares herself, her talent and her knowledge with others.

Message. She was sure there was something important hidden there. Perhaps a clue to the treasure. She searched the bowl of flowers, the cobwebs in the corners, the lattice- and the lace… Somehow she totally missed it. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Afterglow Chartz Cubine Eke Gourdgeous Muchin Quandry Vermal

Yo ho ho… Not all treasure is jewels and gold! Sometimes, the treasure lies within each of us, waiting to be discovered. If you are tangling, and looking for your own, internal treasures, follow the link over to Eni Oken’s Tan Treasure Video lesson! Her video will take you through all the steps to create your personal treasure map. Zentangle drawn on an Official Tan Renaissance tile using a black, brown and sepia Micron pens.

Swirls. Am I looking down at a carpet? A muddy river? Foam at the edge of a wave on the beach? It’s an interesting, visual mystery! Sand Swirl is one of my favorite tangles to draw. It’s simple echoed lines allow your mind to enter the Zen zone quickly. Here, I used three different colors of ink to give the tile more depth and dimension. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen, warm grey and cool grey Copic Multiliner.

What’s up, Dewd? Zentangle has introduced a new tangle, Dewd, along with the debut of the new Project Packs! I decided to do it on a black tile, in keeping with the spirit of the introduction video, here. I used two different pink, metallic pens and two different silver pens so that I would have a tiny bit of variation between the inner shape and the outer auras.

Another’s view. The tiles above and below were created by my husband. If you remember, from yesterday’s post, I mentioned that I had asked all of my relatives to draw Zentangles for my birthday in 2010. Recently, I found them again and got to reminisce about that time and to see all the wonderful tiles everyone made. For this first tile, my sweetheart used a heart as the central string!

Note: I had some trouble scanning this drawing because it is in a large-format sketchbook. The upper left isn’t really blurry. That was cause by the drawing page not being flat on the scanner. This Zentangle was created by my husband a little over 7 years ago. At the beginning of October, 2010, I gave all of my family members blank tiles and asked them each to draw a Zentangle for my birthday present.

Tiny details. This tile is a result of Eni Oken’s Tiny Details Lesson. This excellent video shows you exactly how to create and shade areas of a tile which include little, tiny detail drawings which can be a major challenge to shade! I love tiny drawing and repetitive patterns that are very close to each other. There is just something really soothing and satisfying about filling predefined areas with tangles like these, making this tile lots of fun to create.

Fractalized stars. Recently, Eni Oken added a lesson about fractalizing tangles to her Art Club members. It was a fantastic lesson and everyone had a lot of fun creating beautiful tiles. I decided to try Betweed for my tangle because it looks like a star to me, and I love anything having to do with stars! The “rule” I used was to draw a new, smaller Betweed in each space created by the original rendition.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 2, page 45, Exercise 4. For this exercise, we were to use all the same tangles: Shattuck, Jetties and Bales, but use different shading. I think Amanda (above) did a fantastic job with this tile! I love that she used several tanglations: Bales, Hollibaugh, Florz, and Jetties! My favorite is her version of Bales. It has so much depth to it now! My artwork is above.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 2, page 36. In this chapter, we are learning three new tangles: Bales, Jetties and Shattuck. For the first tile in this chapter, there are step-by-step instructions that tell you where to put each tangle and how to draw and shade it. I did make a few choices like drawing straight instead of curved lines for the Shattuck, and I chose to overlap my Jetties, rather than make them all touching.

From the Zentangle Primer: Exercise 2, page 33. For this tile, we were told to select two tangles and to alter or combine them to create a new tanglation. I chose to use Printemps and used it to create the strips for Hollibaugh. This ended up presenting a challenge, because it was difficult to distinguish edges where the strips crossed over each other. I ended up outlining each strip with a wider-nibbed pen to create stronger edges.

As I’m sure you’ve seen on various posts, I mostly use Strathmore Bristol Vellum as the paper for my tiles. Note: It’s important to understand that this is not thin, translucent vellum. “Bristol” is bristol board, a form of very thick paper. The word vellum, here, refers to the finish on the paper. The vellum finish has a slight tooth to it. Bristol board also comes in a smooth finish, which is very popular for illustration work.

From the Zentangle Primer: Exercise 1, page 33. For this exercise, we each had to create a Zentangle using the same tangles as the first. However, we were to shade them differently. Amanda’s artwork is above. You can see how she shaded around the outside of the central bobble which makes it appear more like it is floating above the tile. She also altered Printemps from her original style.