What are these creatures we found hiding under the leaves? Each one is different, bearing fragmented patterns creating their own interpretation? It is our third day along this path. We’ve grown bolder, looking here and there and finding new things or changing the old. Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle tile using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Articulated Molygon

Now, it’s a stroll along the path. This tile is simply Purk. It’s like finding a familiar stone along the way. Comfortable. Fun! Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle Bijou tile using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Purk

When you use a grid-type tangle, you don’t have to do it in a perfect grid shape! Here, I wanted to see what it would look like to use Bales, but make a fairly wonky grid, possibly with some perspective to it. So I made part of the lines curved, and varied the distance between the lines, just to see what it would look like. This type of exercise is good to do every so often.

We are made of stars. This tile is actually from 2010. It is the first time I drew the tangle Afterglow. I liked the idea of not anchoring just a single iteration and instead, creating many, growing out of and around each other. At the time, I had no idea how to shade it, so I just didn’t. I am thinking about repeating this tile, but with all the experience I have now added to the design.

Starting here. When I first starting tangling, I didn’t have too many problems with patterns that had straight lines. But circles were really difficult for me. It is difficult, almost impossible for me to write in cursive, and I suppose there are similar difficulties with drawing circles in many ways. So, I figured I would start out really big. My thinking was I could do these, starting from the center, and carefully go round and round, rotating my paper, and it should work.

In the beginning. When I first learned about Zentangle, there were about 100 “official” tangles. There are 164 now, and a few are added every year. To learn the tangles and practice them, I used to draw monotangles in my sketchbook. This one, of BB, is from before I started putting dates on them, so the most recent it could possibly be is early 2010. I’m posting it today, even though this is actually really old, because it was brought to my attention that there was no example of BB on my website!

I am still working on my project from this week. I’m sure most of you have figured out what I’m making, but just in case you haven’t, today I’m posting something totally different. This monotangle of Sand Swirl was fun to do. Sometimes it’s very calming to just draw auras! I will be showing you my project towards the end of next week (I hope,) and you’ll finally get to see all the tiles put together, so stay tuned!

Amanda asked me, the other day about Indy-Rella. I told her I hadn’t used it very much because I always end up drawing it so tiny. She did it on a white tile, using black ink, making the elements rather large, which inspired me to try this. I started with the white pen. But I still didn’t get mine as larger as hers. So I thought it might be fun to add different color inks that would make it look like they were fading out on the tile.

I look at this tile and I see many things. From a layer of stones arranged as the floor of a patio to stretched out Cat’s Cradles or perhaps a section of lace. Maybe I’m looking at some sort of atomic level structure under the microscope. Who knows what it is? Crazy N’Zepple works as a fill for sections in a design or as a full design in it’s own right.

This Zentangle is brought to you today by Thomàs Pádro. He has named this one Pickpocket. I’ve actually done a slight variation here. Instead of straight lines, I’ve chosen to curve mine a bit. I think it softens the design, making it a little less rigid and a little more feminine. I also chose to make it appear as if two different kind of materials were woven together by adding the grey auras to every other section instead of all of them.

Squashed together. This is a tangle that, until yesterday, I really didn’t like very much. When I pulled it from the tangle jar, I just kind of plopped it into my tile as a type of medallion, because I really didn’t know what to do with it. Then I watched this video from Helen Williams. Her blog is A Little Lime, and has lots of interesting tangle related information!

Bones. Their culture was built on the bones of their ancestors. The believed these relics spoke to them, leading them towards the future without forgetting their past. This is another tile celebrating and exploring fragments. This is B2 from the Zentangle Primer. I ended up not putting the second set of lines inside each shape and just let the color define the areas. I chose to stop because it looked so much like a grid of bones.

This is actually the second-to-last of the Project Pack 1 series, but I saved it to do last. Unlike the other projects in this series, this one is done on a tan tile. In the video Maria shows us her daughter’s beautiful photograph of pumpkin seeds that have arranged themselves into a spiral. It was the inspiration for this exercise, where we are using Pokeleaf, drawn in a spiral pattern.

This monotangle Zendala is from Project Pack 1. In the video, Molly tells us that the pre-strung zendala in each pack was chosen at random, so there were several different designs. I didn’t have a pre-strung tile, so I copied the string from the tile at the beginning of the video. This is the second Zendala tile that I’ve drawn on. For this one, the bigger size didn’t bother me.

I thought it might be interesting to do an overlapped version of Irradial on a tan tile using brown and sepia ink. As I did the first, brown lines, the pen was very juicy and made a large brown blog where all the lines converged. I wasn’t totally happy with it, but I decided to continue. Then, the sepia pen was very dry, making light, almost sketchy lines and almost no blog at the convergence.