I just had to do a tile with a tango, or hybrid of Diva-Dance and Undu! They were such perfect partners… As if they were made for each other! Zentangle drawn on a tan, Official Zentangle 3Z tile using a dark blue, Pigma Micron PN pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Diva Dance Undu

Northwest. Various parts of the country have a history of native, tribal art which influences the decorative choices of that particular area. Recently, my husband traveled to Portland, Oregon for a business conference. While there, he found a book, “Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast” by Hilary Stewart. I like the graphic effect produced by using black, white and red. So I decided to give it a try on a Zentangle.

All dressed up. This little bijou is a remake of one I did at the CZT seminar. I decided to dress it up a bit by mounting it on a tan tile and adding a few frames. Huggins has become one of my favorite, meditative tangles! Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle Bijou tile using a black and brown, Pigma Micron pens and white, Sakura Gelly Roll. Shading done with graphite pencil and Copic markers.

This is another tile that I, unfortunately, left at Seminar. But I have to say that I actually like this version better! I normally put finished tiles in my scrapbook on a black background. But here, I decided to change it up a bit because I made the edge of the 3Z black. With it on a taupe background, I think it stands out better. Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle 3Z tile using a black, sepia and brown, Pigma Micron pens and white Sakura Gelly Roll pen.

Remembrance. As we walk on this path, I am reminded to spend time with others I’m walking here with. The time will go so fast and we will, literally, be scattered to all the corners of the earth. But we will remember each other, and this special time here. This beautiful, rosemary stem is drawn using the tangle Verdigogh. Rosemary is for rememberance. I wanted to add something to it, but I couldn’t decide what.

One of the things I love about tan tiles is the ability to add both shades of grey and white highlights. In addition, these tiles are perfect for both brown, black and even white ink, creating lots of variety. All of these factors, added together take simple tangles to a much more sophisticated level! Zentangle drawn on a tan Official Zentangle 3Z tile using black and brown, Pigma Micron pens.

I’m building a library of tiles done with a single fragment from the Zentangle Primer. Today, I decided to tackle J15, using blue and brown ink. I love the effect this tangle produced when used en masse. The large, interlocking circles receded to stand behind the blue, web-like shapes, so I simply accented the illusion by shading with the appropriate colored pencil. Creating tiles like this, with fragments, is kind of like discovering buried treasure.

While I was working on yesterday’s tile, I was thinking that I would like to try this technique on a tan tile, with a Southwestern, Native American pottery theme. I gave it a shot here. I’m not totally enthralled with it because I feel like the entire tile reads too “brown,” without enough light contrast. I will probably give this another try over the weekend. That said, I do like the tile for what it is!

Armed. As she looked into the tank, she could see that these creatures had some kind of appendages that sort of sproinged out of their bodies. They ranged in all sizes from teeny tiny to so large she couldn’t even see the body in the murk. It looked as if the smaller ones became entwined in the larger as they grew. But wouldn’t these prisoners become a burden over time?

Bones. Their culture was built on the bones of their ancestors. The believed these relics spoke to them, leading them towards the future without forgetting their past. This is another tile celebrating and exploring fragments. This is B2 from the Zentangle Primer. I ended up not putting the second set of lines inside each shape and just let the color define the areas. I chose to stop because it looked so much like a grid of bones.

WhollyHollibaugh. Recently, Zentangle released a new video, #18, in the Kitchen Table series that illustrated the principle of seeing behind parts of a design through a window, or cutout in a tangle. Hollibaugh was used to illustrate this, so I decided to create this tile for my collection showing the concept. They call the tangle enhancement “Wholly Hollibaugh.” Zentangle drawn on Stonehenge Kraft using black and brown Pigma Micron pens and Sakura white gel pen.

Reticula. I happen to love optical illusions. I think that’s one of the reasons that I love exploring Zentangle reticulum. By using some careful shading, this tile may look like a series of “Ys” or it may look like “blossoms”. Prior to shading, it looks a bit like the tangle Fassett! It’s a lot of fun to play with. The fragment used here is B13 from the Zentangle Primer.

This wonderful tile was created by my daughter. She is my student and protégé! She is such an amazing artist and she loves to be my class tester. It never ceases to amaze me what she will do and whether she will change something because she likes her way better. I’m so proud of her and so happy we will both become CZTs at the same seminar! She saw my similar tile and asked me to teach her how to do it.

This is my own design, done in the Tints on Tan style. I wanted to finish out the week of beach-themed tiles with something original! After looking at pictures of sea horses, I realized their bodies are basically made up of a bumpy grid. Once I got that, the rest was easy! I didn’t add any wave foam or sand dots because this one is actually meant to be under water.

This is the final, official tile for the Tints on Tan, beach series. These tiles, combining colored pencil and tangling have been so much fun to do. Technically, these would be considered ZIAs (Zentangle Inspired Art) rather than standard Zentangles. However, if you like this type of thing, they can be just as “zen” and relaxing to do. I particularly like the subject matter because the ocean reminds of of summer and vacations, happy times and warm weather.