Emerald Isle. There is so much about Ireland that has influenced culture all over the world. Literature, music and dance come to mind. In the United States about 33 million Americans claim some Irish ancestry. These ancestors came to the U.S. as immigrants, and brought with them their heritage. In speech, dress, religion, foods and traditions they influenced the American way of life permanently. Just as any other cultural group that is different from the main, the suffered prejudice.

Incubation. She found a group of eggs in various stages of growth in the Royal Nursery. She had no idea this was their method of reproduction until now. She wondered if each egg started with such elaborate patterns or if they were decorated after they were laid. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Caviar Meer Patena Printemps Purk Shattuck

This wonderful tile was created by my daughter. She is my student and protégé! She is such an amazing artist and she loves to be my class tester. It never ceases to amaze me what she will do and whether she will change something because she likes her way better. I’m so proud of her and so happy we will both become CZTs at the same seminar! She saw my similar tile and asked me to teach her how to do it.

This ValenTangle 2018 tile was created using Spoken as the basis, as we were instructed for Day 1. Hearts were added to the top and bottom of each arm and then the centers filled with Betweed and Tipple. I wanted something textural, yet simple for the background, so I used grey marker to fill it with tiny Printemps. Over all, I love the way this came out. I didn’t have a particularly clear concept in my head when I started, so I just went where the artistic muse took me, and it worked out.

This is the final, official tile for the Tints on Tan, beach series. These tiles, combining colored pencil and tangling have been so much fun to do. Technically, these would be considered ZIAs (Zentangle Inspired Art) rather than standard Zentangles. However, if you like this type of thing, they can be just as “zen” and relaxing to do. I particularly like the subject matter because the ocean reminds of of summer and vacations, happy times and warm weather.

This is the third tile in the Tints on Tan series. I think this one is my favorite. I love the color combination and Printemps is one of my favorite tangles. Zentangle drawn on Kraft Stonehenge paper from Legion, using a white gel pen and a brown, Micron pen. Color is from colored pencils. Tangles: Printemps

This is my second tile in the Tints on Tan series. I liked doing the starfish. It wasn’t too compilcated, and this time, I planned better and the water is going over the the ends of the arms! Zentangle drawn on Kraft Stonehenge paper from Legion, using a black and brown, Micron pens. Color is from colored pencils. Tangles: Flux Printemps Tipple

Tints on Tan is a set of classes created by CZTs Marty Deckle and Jenny Peruzzi. It was first presented at CanTangle in July of 2015. Recently, the kit has become available on Etsy, and there is now a Facebook group for this style of tangling. I decided to do each shape from the beach set on it’s own tile, along with the full grouping. This is my first tile, the sea shell.

Palette. Her basket was full of magical designs just waiting to be added to a frock or a cushion. Some plain, some fancy, some simple, some complex, woven together they created a magical mixture for the customers to choose from. The basic string for this Zentangle came from the “Tangler’s Palette” stencils from Acadia Laser Creations on Etsy. I wanted this set of stencils as soon as I saw them.

This is my first tile from the Delft Delights kit. I purchased my kit from AcadiaLaserCreations on Etsy. It was designed by Marguerite Samama, a CZT® from the Netherlands. In addition to the instructions, the kit includes two Zendala-sized and one standard-sized Official Zentangle tiles. It does not include any pens or pencils, but a list is provided. I did not have the exact products listed, so I found the closest things I had in my supplies and used those.

For my final Crazy Huggins sampler, I cut a large, apprentice-sized tile from a new paper I got recently. I filled the tile with Crazy Huggins shapes, then filled each element with another tangle. Somewhere along the line, the design developed a mind of its own, and decided not to be symmetrical anymore. But, honestly, I think that just made it “interesting!” This tile took quite a while to complete.

If you saw my New Year’s post, then you know that I have challenged myself to work on black tiles more frequently this year. I want to develop techniques and find the materials that work for me. For that reason, for every challenge or lesson from Eni or any other artist, I am making a black tile for the theme as well as a normal one. To that end, this is my black tile from Eni’s Zentangle Basics lesson.

The newest Art Club video from Eni Oken’s Art Club is a lesson on Zentangle Basics. Almost everyone, when they take their first Zentangle lesson from a CZT, creates a basic tile, using certain tangles that illustrate what Zentangle is all about. Eni’s video is no different, (after all, she IS a Certified Zentangle Teacher!) This is the tile I created while watching the video. I’ve been tangling now for many years.

This tile is a direct result of following the instructions on the blog post for the First Day of the 12 Days of Zentangle over at zentangle.com. The purpose of this exercise was to draw each of the tangles that are used to teach a brand new person how to tangle. The most common tangles used for a beginner’s tile are Crescent Moon and Hollibaugh and they are often followed by Florz (or Bales) and Printemps.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 3, page 55, Exercise #9. We are instructed to let our tangles extend beyond the border. In my tile, above, I decided to extend Braze all the way to the very edge of the tile. It looks as if it was dropped onto the drawing. I made the border very definite by turning it into a tangled frame all around the center of the tile.