I combined several different techniques on this tile. I didn’t start out to make a Monotangle. Originally I was going to put a bunch of different tangles in the spaces between the largest Ruutz. But I just got into the zen of it and fractalized Ruutz down three iterations. Then I decided to color the various levels. The top level I colored pink, the second was a lime green, and the smallest was a light blue-violet.

Reticulum. Recently, Zentangle released a Kitchen Table video that featured using Tripoli as a Reticulum (as the underlying structure) and filling each section with a fragment. I chose Fragment G13 from the Primer. I have never liked Tripoli until now! But I will not discount it in the future. This gave me a really good understanding of Reticula and Fragments. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen.

Humpf! Ok, this is the Zentangle version of a “bad hair day”. It was fun to do because I didn‘t think about how any of it was going together. But when I was all done and looked at it at arm‘s length, I could see that it was a mish-mash of tangles that didn‘t go together all that well. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen.

Yes, I‘m weird. And proud of it. Sometimes I just stick things into corners or odd places to add a touch of whimsy and surprise. It‘s fun and makes for eye-catching, interesting drawings. This drawing kind of messes with your mind because of the variety of depth of the shading and sizes of the tangles. In addition, since I was tired of drawing with black, I decided to switch to a sepia pen and use a couple of brown colored pencils to do the shading.

Sometimes you just need a little color in your life! I recently got a set of Faber-Castel Polychromos Artist‘s Pencils. I‘ve always used Prismacolor pencils, but over the last few years the quality of the pencils themselves has gone down hill. So I was looking around to see if there was anything better and found the Polychromos. For starters, they are oil-based, instead of wax-based. That means the pencil lead is harder, and puts down a more vibrant layer very quickly.