Another’s view. The tiles above and below were created by my husband. If you remember, from yesterday’s post, I mentioned that I had asked all of my relatives to draw Zentangles for my birthday in 2010. Recently, I found them again and got to reminisce about that time and to see all the wonderful tiles everyone made. For this first tile, my sweetheart used a heart as the central string!

Day 2. For this day, we are adding three new tangles to our repertoire: Fescu, Nekton and Knight’s Bridge. We were also instructed to practice making various strings. For Amanda’s tile above, as you can see, her string is much more complex than on Day 1. She also used areas of repeated tangles to tie everything together. Matthew did a wonderfully curvy string that gave him an interesting open space to fill with graceful Fescu!

Amanda’s Day 1. You will recall that I said yesterday I was working on a challenge with another tangler? Well, here is her tangle based on the same lesson! I love how she made the Tipple into bubbles, including a few popping at the upper and lower right! Amanda’s son, Matthew also did the Day 1 exercise! Matthew is a 17-year old, highschool junior. He is in his second year of art classes and is a very talented artist.

Day 1. This week, I’m working on a challenge with another tangler named Amanda. We both have the book, “One Zentangle a Day” by Beckah Krahula. Today’s tangle is for Day 1, which introduces Tipple, Static and Crescent Moon. I chose to follow the standard, Zentangle method, and started with dots in the corners and then connecting them with a frame. I used a simple string and filled each section with a tangle.

Unknown. I don’t know what the tangle at the upper right is. I can’t find it in my step-outs. If you recognize it, please join in on Facebook and let me know! Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle tile using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Black Box Nipa Nzeppel Shattuck Tipple Wadical Yincut

There be dragons! This tile is directly inspired by Eni Oken’s Tangled Dragons blogpost. I’ve been wanting to give it a go for quite a while, but just haven’t had time until yesterday. It was a little tricky figuring out how to do the overlapping loops, but I think it worked out well, over all! I think I want to try one with some color next time. Maybe I will try some distress inks with it!

Color. This was the first Zentangle that I ever used color on. I even used my markers to create the shading. I didn’t do another full color Zentangle until this year, because I really didn’t like the way this came out, at the time. It just seemed too alien for a Zentangle. Now, I don’t mind color and actually enjoy it once in a while! Zentangle drawn on Official Zentangle tile using a black, Micron pen.

Around and around. I ended up with a lot of tangles that were basically circular this time. But with a bit of careful placement, I think I managed to make them all play nice with each other! Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Apollonian Waves Caviar Crescent Wave Gewgle Nipa Punzel Scallops Strircles Tipple

Cream. I like this simple Zentangle drawn on cream colored paper. However, it turned out that the pens bled a lot because of the high fiber content. So I guess I will have to keep on looking for a different brand of this color paper. Zentangle drawn on BK Rives cream colored printmaking paper using red and black Pigma Micron pens. Tangles: Bumpety Bump Fracas Kule Nzeppel Tipple

Leaves. Take a close look at the string used for this Zentangle. Do you see it? I traced around a leaf template to create the basic string. The Ennies at the bottom left was added because I felt it needed something there, so it‘s in addition to the leaves. Zentangle drawn on olive card stock using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Courant Crescent Moon Cubine Ennies Flux Holey Huggins Isochor Tipple

Dingbatz. I‘m still trying to wrap my brain around the Dingbatz-style Mookas. I decided to try making them over-sized to see if that made any difference. I kind of like the way tese wrap around to the back of the tile. But After I did them, I realized I should apply the same techniques used for twisted ropes to them. I‘ll have to give that a try here in the future!

Fire. Black opals are the most valuable opals in the world. The most beautiful examples of these come from the Lightning Ridge mining area in Australia. Opals are classified according to the pattern of the fire within the stone. This example is a cross between pinfire and palette. While some lists show that Tourmaline or Pink Zircon is the gemstone for those who were born in October, opal is actually the traditional stone.

Which way? Here, after drawing the string, I‘ve used ribbon tangles to define spaces that are filled with other tangles. For me, this is a simple way of creating a Zentangle from randomly chosen designs. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Deco Border Dex Isochor Juke Meer Snail Tipple Umble Yincut

Leftie-Louie. This tile was done entirely with my non-dominant hand. That includes the shading and even the date and signature on the back. I was actually surprised at how well it turned out! Zentangle drawn on Official Zentangle tile using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Crescent Moon Echoism Fescu Florz Nzeppel Pokeleaf Tipple

Simplicity. I decided, for this tile, to return to the very roots of tangling. This string and these patterns are often used by CZTs when teaching the first Zentangle class. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol with a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Crescent Moon Florz Static Tipple