Autumn. They brought her sheaves and heads of grain and placed them at her feet. As she looked down at them, against the hem of her gown, she understood. It is the time of harvest, to prepare for the cold to come. It is time to burn the man of straw and rags. They must celebrate with things sweet and warm and ready everyone for the days of propitiation.

Island vacation. She looked down, out of the window of the raised hut to the cobblestone path and imagined the adventures that were possible here. This Zentangle had a life of it’s own and ended up nothing like it’s original conception! Once of the tangles that came out of the jar was Tuffit. I never know what to do with it, since it kind of looks like a cross between an alien space ship and sofa pillow.

Show time. This tile was drawn from Eni Oken‘s tutorial for the Showgirl tangle. I have to confess, I had a lot of problems with this one. Showgirl isn‘t my favorite tangle to begin with, and I‘m not really happy with the way these came out. But after several false starts, I decided to persevere. I was kind of surprised that the end result is better than I thought it would be.

Inner ocean. Another one by the sea! This tile makes me think of viewing under the deep ocean on a microscopic basis. From single-celled creatures to tiny plants and even prismatic organic elements, they all seem to float towards a net that was cast from a vessel above. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Tangles: Angel Fish Black-Eyed Peas Blooming Butter Chillon Locar Tidings Vitruvius Zander

The process. One of the things about tangling is that it is a meditative process. I focus on each line I draw, and often don‘t have a clear picture of where the over-all design is going. This is particularly true when I select tangles at random, as I did here. Sometimes the over-all design works, and sometimes it doesn‘t. But there are days when the process is what is most important.

Triangular. I usually don‘t use straight lines to draw the string on my tile. Here, I decided to use straight lines to make triangular areas on my tile as the basic divisions. I also had a hard time making up my mind, which was the visual “top” of the tile when I was finished, which is why Msst is moving in an uncommon direction. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen.