Inchies. Remember last week when I showed you my desk scattered with some old art pieces? Well, here’s what I did with some of them! I created an inchie mosaic following Eni’s instructions in her Inchies Mosaic Video Lesson. Inchies are little, 1-inch squares of art. This is my first mosaic, following the instructions in the lesson. I got my tiles cut a bit wonky, which is totally my fault.

This is my second tile from Eni’s Fragmented Windows lesson. I really wanted to try this in blue because it reminded me so much of floor plans. I also made the grid a bit smaller than the first one. I’m not sure if I like it better, or not. I did have to use a finer tipped pen to draw the fragments because the squares were so tiny!

I had so much fun creating yesterday’s Zenbutton I decided that I wanted to do more of them in different styles. So, for this one, I’m using Marguerite Samama’s Delft Delights style. If you need instructions in this style, they are available from AcadiaLaserCreations on Etsy. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a blue Pigma Micron pen and a cobalt Copic Multiliner. Shading done with colored and graphite pencils.

I’m still working my way through the various fragments in the Zentangle Primer. For this exercise, I chose K14. This is another very geometric fragment, and it is like Emingle, except triangular. I actually drew it twice in each triangle, once in blue-black and then again in blue. By shading it with blue pencil it was possible to create another star-like pattern. I find these very relaxing to do.

This is another fragment experimentation. This time, I used Fragment A13 from the Zentangle Primer. This fragment is similar to the tangle Intersection by Suzanne McNeill. However, when you put them together, next to each other, they create an interesting, interlocking, triangular pattern. I chose to alter that with the shading by trisecting each one, creating a diamond pattern. Again, it’s amazing what optical illusions you can create with simple patterns and shading!

This is my version of the bonus tile from the Delft Delights series. This was an interesting challenge in that I wanted each section to be the same as its partners. I like the way it came out, and the coloring. I think it’s time to experiment with some other tangles to see what else can be accomplished using this technique! Zentangle drawn on an Official Zentangle tile using blue marking pens.

I decided to try the Delft Delights techniques on a 3Z-sized tile, thinking it would look a bit like a pottery shard. I also did a bit of research into patterns used on Delftware, so that I could find tangles that corresponded. The ones shown here I actually found on examples on the internet! Zentangle drawn on 3Z-sized Strathmore Vellum Bristol using blue Zig and Staedtler markers. Shading done with colored pencils.

This is my first tile from the Delft Delights kit. I purchased my kit from AcadiaLaserCreations on Etsy. It was designed by Marguerite Samama, a CZT® from the Netherlands. In addition to the instructions, the kit includes two Zendala-sized and one standard-sized Official Zentangle tiles. It does not include any pens or pencils, but a list is provided. I did not have the exact products listed, so I found the closest things I had in my supplies and used those.

Fractalized stars. Recently, Eni Oken added a lesson about fractalizing tangles to her Art Club members. It was a fantastic lesson and everyone had a lot of fun creating beautiful tiles. I decided to try Betweed for my tangle because it looks like a star to me, and I love anything having to do with stars! The “rule” I used was to draw a new, smaller Betweed in each space created by the original rendition.

Wrapped up. This Zentangle is the result of two different Facebook posts. In one group, someone asked about shading a Zentangle that was drawn in blue ink. That got me to thinking about how I would handle the situation. So, for this tile, I’ve used blue ink. For the shading I used both colored pencil and graphite. I think the combination of the two allows for more dramatic depth than using the blue pencil alone.

Crazy. For this Zentangle, Nzepple has taken a walk on the wild side! This is referred to as Crazy Nzepple. I just wanted to do something simple and claming, and this fit the bill. I chose blue because it is the color of water and sky. It is soothing and calming. I added the gel pen accents, both the metallic blue dots and the white highlights to give the tile more dimension.

Frost. It has already snowed in Montana. It won’t be that long before it snows in other states. This made me think about it being the time of year when various parts of the country wake up to frost on the leaves and flower petals. These two tangles, Arukas and Nekton, when combined like this remind me of the patterns of frost that are seen on an early morning fall walk.