Palette. Her basket was full of magical designs just waiting to be added to a frock or a cushion. Some plain, some fancy, some simple, some complex, woven together they created a magical mixture for the customers to choose from. The basic string for this Zentangle came from the “Tangler’s Palette” stencils from Acadia Laser Creations on Etsy. I wanted this set of stencils as soon as I saw them.

I decided to try the Delft Delights techniques on a 3Z-sized tile, thinking it would look a bit like a pottery shard. I also did a bit of research into patterns used on Delftware, so that I could find tangles that corresponded. The ones shown here I actually found on examples on the internet! Zentangle drawn on 3Z-sized Strathmore Vellum Bristol using blue Zig and Staedtler markers. Shading done with colored pencils.

If you saw my New Year’s post, then you know that I have challenged myself to work on black tiles more frequently this year. I want to develop techniques and find the materials that work for me. For that reason, for every challenge or lesson from Eni or any other artist, I am making a black tile for the theme as well as a normal one. To that end, this is my black tile from Eni’s Zentangle Basics lesson.

The newest Art Club video from Eni Oken’s Art Club is a lesson on Zentangle Basics. Almost everyone, when they take their first Zentangle lesson from a CZT, creates a basic tile, using certain tangles that illustrate what Zentangle is all about. Eni’s video is no different, (after all, she IS a Certified Zentangle Teacher!) This is the tile I created while watching the video. I’ve been tangling now for many years.

This is the fourth exercise from Project Pack 1. It is a second version of Bales. This tile is very, very simple. It’s all about the added lines transforming the regular seed shape found in the tangle into something beyond itself by repeating the strokes to fill in the centers. It was fun and very calming to draw this Zentangle. But I feel it is just so plain, compared to what I normally draw!

This is another exercise from Project Pack 1. This time, we’re drawing a variation of Bales on a black tile. You can watch Martha create this version here. The differences between mine and the video are that I used the narrowest Gelly Roll to draw the grid lines, and then the 08 to draw the diamonds. I also chose to use the white pastel a bit differently. I drew small lines radiating between the lines at the intersections.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 3, page 55, Exercise #8. For this string exercise we were to go “beyond the string,” and push past boundaries. I think Amanda did a fantastic job, compared to her original string, which you can see below! I love the way her Pokeleaf meandered around part of the string and then went up and joined into the Verdigogh at the upper right! Amanda’s talent and distinctive style is slowly emerging with each exercise that she does!

Dementia is a terrible thing. It steals a person’s mind a little bit at a time… for a long time. This Zentangle was created by my Mother-in-Law for my birthday in 2010. I was tangling with her very often, teaching her various tangles and techniques. I thought it would be good for her. She had had a heart attack and quadruple bypass surgery. She was on a lot of medication.

Christmas market. She loved this time of year. Even the cold weather didn’t bother her. There were so many things to choose from: exotic fabrics and trims, fancy jewelry and decorations, beautiful baskets and ceramics. Even the colorful awnings and tents brought her joy! Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Vellum Bristol using a black, Micron pen. Shading done with graphite pencil. Tangles: Bales Criss & Cross Dyon Huggins Mooka Quipple Sez Shard Striping Tidings

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 3, page 55, Exercise #7. In this lesson, we are learning about strings. For the first exercise, we are supposed to combine two (or more) sections of our string together to form a new section that is better suited for the tangle we want to use. Here is what Amanda’s original string looked like, so you can compare it with her finished Zentangle above.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 2, page 45, Exercise 4. For this exercise, we were to use all the same tangles: Shattuck, Jetties and Bales, but use different shading. I think Amanda (above) did a fantastic job with this tile! I love that she used several tanglations: Bales, Hollibaugh, Florz, and Jetties! My favorite is her version of Bales. It has so much depth to it now! My artwork is above.

From the Zentangle Primer: Lesson 2, page 36. In this chapter, we are learning three new tangles: Bales, Jetties and Shattuck. For the first tile in this chapter, there are step-by-step instructions that tell you where to put each tangle and how to draw and shade it. I did make a few choices like drawing straight instead of curved lines for the Shattuck, and I chose to overlap my Jetties, rather than make them all touching.

New. This Zentangle incorporates two new tangles that I haven’t done before: Pixioze and Kwazeela. The first one is on the far left, Pixioze, and was created by Margaret Bremner. You can find out all about it here. The second one, Kwazeela, is from Eni Oken. You can read about it here. In addition, Eni has created a Zentangle incorporating both of these that you can see here.

Graphic. I love this paper! Using a tan paper allows me to add both high and low lights to the various designs. In addition, this combination produces a very graphic effect. I bought a large sheet of this paper for a few dollars and cut out my own “tiles. This makes using the paper very affordable. Zentangle drawn on BFK Rives tan print making paper using brown, sepia and black Micron pens.

Land of two suns. Whenever I look at this tile, I see plants growing on an alien earth; a planet with two suns. Zentangle drawn on Strathmore Bristol Vellum using a black Micron pen. Tangles: Bales Betweed Eke Evoke Pepper Warble XYP