Recently I did a post about the Ambler tangle in the Entanglement library. Ambler uses an element called a box spiral. It turns out, box spirals appear in several tangles, most notably the Box Spirals tangle. In this post, we’ll talk about the Entanglement BoxSpiral class, which implements the Box Spirals tangle. The box spiral used in Ambler as it is implemented in Entanglement is very specific. It consists of nine lines, and always rotates counter-clockwise.

The Entanglement library now supports Ambler! This officially doubles the number of tangles it can produce! Two tangles! Progress! OK, so two tangles isn’t really all that many, but still! Progress! Using Entanglement to draw a basic Ambler is easy. Here’s the program that generated the image at the top of this page: const height = 600; const width = 600; function setup() { createCanvas(width, height); background(255); } function draw() { let amb = new Ambler(width, height, {}); amb.

We have been using the p5.js Javascript library. Several p5.js functions take a color as a parameter. For example, you might call background(color) to set the background color, stroke(color) to set the color used to draw lines, or fill(color) to set the color used to fill in shapes. In our past examples, we’ve set various colors, but we haven’t always done so consistently. So how do you set colors in p5.

In my last two posts, I showed how to draw most of the Aah tangle using the Javascript p5.js library. In this post, the Aah is complete, as you can see from the image below. However, the Javascript code to do so, does not follow directly from what we saw in those previous posts. I have rewritten it and packaged it into a library: Entanglement. More about that shortly.

In my previous post, we came up with a program to generate a single 8-armed component of the aah tangle. In this post, we’ll figure out how to spread them randomly around the canvas, as in the image at the top of the post. We’ll use the program from the last post as a starting point. As a first try, let’s just generate a draw 20 aah images randomly on the canvas.

Any Zentanglers out there who made it through my previous posts on generative art may be wondering whether these techniques can be used to draw Zentangles. Let’s try! Zentangles are built from patterns, called tangles. We’ll try to create a tangle called aah. This is one of the original tangles from the Zentangle originators. There are many variations of aah. We’ll start with a simple 8-armed design. Tandika’s step-out for it looks like this:

In my last post, I talked about generative art, and showed a simple example using Javascript and the p5.js library. In this post, I’ll show another relatively simple example using slightly different techniques. Basically, the process is still the same: program the computer to generate a simple drawing and add an element of randomness. For this example, I am still using Javascript and p5.js. Many of you may be unfamiliar with Javascript.

I am the Artist’s Husband. Yes, I really am Tandika’s husband, and no I am not really an artist. But I am interested in art! I am a software engineer. Recently, I have been looking in to generative art, or art which is created through some automated means, and I thought I would share some of what I have learned as well as some of the results of my early experiments.